Laerdal Medical

Improving the CPR
training experience

Laerdal Medical

Improving the CPR
training experience

 

Laerdal Medical

Improving the CPR
training experience

Laerdal Medical

Improving the CPR
training experience

Improving the CPR
training experience

Laerdal Medical are a world leading provider of training, educational and therapy products for lifesaving and emergency medical care. They asked us to find out how one of their products RQI (A simulation station for training resuscitation skills) could be improved through an integrated motivational rewards system. 

We investigated what attitudes healthcare professionals have regarding the current training system, asking how could the training experience be improved and how might a digital rewards systems be implemented into training programs? 


Laerdal Medical are a world leading provider of training, educational and therapy products for lifesaving and emergency medical care. They asked us to find out how one of their products RQI (A simulation station for training resuscitation skills) could be improved through an integrated motivational rewards system. 

We investigated what attitudes healthcare professionals have regarding the current training system, asking how could the training experience be improved and how might a digital rewards systems be implemented into training programs? 


Laerdal Medical are a world leading provider of training, educational and therapy products for lifesaving and emergency medical care. They asked us to find out how one of their products RQI (A simulation station for training resuscitation skills) could be improved through an integrated motivational rewards system. 

We investigated what attitudes healthcare professionals have regarding the current training system, asking how could the training experience be improved and how might a digital rewards systems be implemented into training programs


Laerdal Medical are a world leading provider of training, educational and therapy products for lifesaving and emergency medical care. They asked us to find out how one of their products RQI (A simulation station for training resuscitation skills) could be improved through an integrated motivational rewards system. 

We investigated what attitudes healthcare professionals have regarding the current training system, asking how could the training experience be improved and how might a digital rewards systems be implemented into training programs


Laerdal needed to find out how  RQI (A Simulation Station for quarterly psychomotor skills activities) could be improved through a motivational rewards system ‘digital badges’?  We investigated what attitudes healthcare professionals have regarding the current training system, asking how could the training experience be improved and how might a digital rewards systems be implemented into training programs

During this Masters internship project we worked directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen. Using co-design and service design methodologies to research and gather insights into how users would engage and respond to potential product developments.  

Year  2017
Collaborators  Rikke Gjerulff, Laerdal Medical
Industry  Healthcare, Technology

 


 

During this Masters internship project we worked directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen. Using co-design and service design methodologies to research and gather insights into how users would engage and respond to potential product developments.  


Year 
 2017

Collaborators  Rikke Gjerulff, Laerdal Medical
Industry  Healthcare, Technology

 


 

During this Masters internship project we worked directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen. Using co-design and service design methodologies to research and gather insights into how users would engage and respond to potential product developments.  

Year  2017
Collaborators  Rikke Gjerulff, Laerdal Medical
Industry  Healthcare, Technology

 


 

During this Masters internship project we worked directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen. Using co-design and service design methodologies to research and gather insights into how users would engage and respond to potential product developments.  

Year  2017
Collaborators  Rikke Gjerulff, Laerdal Medical
Industry  Healthcare, Technology

 


 

In an external student collaboration we worked directly with users of the product, including nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen. Using service design methods with the support and guidance of the human-factors team at Laerdal.

Artboard 1

Approach & Process

The process involved engaging users in ethnographic and qualitative research methods including contextual interviews, persona building, service journey mapping, and service prototypes/ scenario workshops.

Early on in the process we invited a range of Laerdal experts from different departments to explore and define the different user groups. Using a workshop forum we were able to explore various personas and examine assumptions about the service proposition and user groups.


Approach & Process

The process involved engaging users in ethnographic and qualitative research methods including contextual interviews, persona building, service journey mapping, and service prototypes/ scenario workshops.

Early on in the process we invited a range of Laerdal experts from different departments to explore and define the different user groups. Using a workshop forum we were able to explore various personas and examine assumptions about the service proposition and user groups.


Approach & Process

The process involved engaging users in ethnographic and qualitative research methods including contextual interviews, persona building, service journey mapping, and service prototypes/ scenario workshops.

Early on in the process we invited a range of Laerdal experts from different departments to explore and define the different user groups. Using a workshop forum we were able to explore various personas and examine assumptions about the service proposition and user groups.


Approach & Process

The process involved engaging users in ethnographic and qualitative research methods including contextual interviews, persona building, service journey mapping, and service prototypes/ scenario workshops.

Early on in the process we invited a range of Laerdal experts from different departments to explore and define the different user groups. Using a workshop forum we were able to explore various personas and examine assumptions about the service proposition and user groups.


test
pic2
pic1

Coming from out side of the organization, we had been asked to bring our competencies as co-designers into Laerdal, to spark and engage the wider staff in our user-centered processes.  For this reason we set up a tangible survey in a communal area, asking the team to reflect on their own use of CPR RQI training.

This was meant as a way to introduce the wider team to our project and approach and also to spark discussion internally about more tangible or collaborative ways to conduct user research away from a computer screen. 

Coming from out side of the organization, we had been asked to bring our competencies as co-designers into Laerdal, to spark and engage the wider staff in our user-centered processes.  For this reason we set up a tangible survey in a communal area, asking the team to reflect on their own use of CPR RQI training.

This was meant as a way to introduce the wider team to our project and approach and also to spark discussion internally about more tangible or collaborative ways to conduct user research away from a computer screen. 

Coming from out side of the organization, we had been asked to bring our competencies as co-designers into Laerdal, to spark and engage the wider staff in our user-centered processes.  For this reason we set up a tangible survey in a communal area, asking the team to reflect on their own use of CPR RQI training.

This was meant as a way to introduce the wider team to our project and approach and also to spark discussion internally about more tangible or collaborative ways to conduct user research away from a computer screen. 

Coming from out side of the organization, we had been asked to bring our competencies as co-designers into Laerdal, to spark and engage the wider staff in our user-centered processes.  For this reason we set up a tangible survey in a communal area, asking the team to reflect on their own use of CPR RQI training.

This was meant as a way to introduce the wider team to our project and approach and also to spark discussion internally about more tangible or collaborative ways to conduct user research away from a computer screen. 


Co-creating a service with
healthcare professionals

Working directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen we used various methods to gather qualitative insights. For example, contextual interviews where we asked participants to walkthrough daily operations and created a service journey of training CPR on RQI.

In order to understand more specific motivations towards training we carried out a 'future service scenario' with nurses, where we proposed a training service where motivational rewards, competitions and tangible rewards were integrated and collected atittudes and insights.

Co-creating a service with healthcare professionals

Working directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen we used various methods to gather qualitative insights. For example, contextual interviews where we asked participants to walkthrough daily operations and created a service journey of training CPR on RQI.

In order to understand more specific motivations towards training we carried out a 'future service scenario' with nurses, where we proposed a training service where motivational rewards, competitions and tangible rewards were integrated and collected atittudes and insights.

Co-creating a service with
healthcare professionals

Working directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen we used various methods to gather qualitative insights. For example, contextual interviews where we asked participants to walkthrough daily operations and created a service journey of training CPR on RQI.

In order to understand more specific motivations towards training we carried out a 'future service scenario' with nurses, where we proposed a training service where motivational rewards, competitions and tangible rewards were integrated and collected atittudes and insights.

Co-creating a service with
healthcare professionals

Working directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen we used various methods to gather qualitative insights. For example, contextual interviews where we asked participants to walkthrough daily operations and created a service journey of training CPR on RQI.

In order to understand more specific motivations towards training we carried out a 'future service scenario' with nurses, where we proposed a training service where motivational rewards, competitions and tangible rewards were integrated and collected atittudes and insights.

Co-creating a service with healthcare professionals

Working directly with users of the product - nurses and health care workers at two hospitals in Copenhagen we used various methods to gather qualitative insights. For example, contextual interviews where we asked participants to walkthrough daily operations and created a service journey of training CPR on RQI.

In order to understand more specific motivations towards training we carried out a 'future service scenario' with nurses, where we proposed a training service where motivational rewards, competitions and tangible rewards were integrated and collected atittudes and insights.

Glostrup_2-
Untitled-3

"This individual competition aspect in healthcare is not something I approve of very much, it is more important that we work as a unit in real life - so some addition aimed towards team motivation would be more useful"

- Trine, Nurse at Hvidovre Hospital 

"This individual competition aspect in healthcare is not something I approve of very much, it is more important that we work as a unit in real life - so some training aimed towards team motivation would be more useful"

- Trine, Nurse at Hvidovre Hospital 

"This individual competition aspect in healthcare is not something I approve of very much, it is more important that we work as a unit in real life - so something aimed towards team motivation would be better"

- Trine, Nurse at Hvidovre Hospital 

"This individual competition aspect in healthcare is not something I approve of very much, it is more important that we work as a unit in real life - so some addition aimed towards team motivation would be more useful"

- Trine, Nurse at Hvidovre Hospital 

"This individual competition aspect in healthcare is not something I approve of very much, it is more important that we work as a unit in real life - so some addition aimed towards team motivation would be more useful"

- Trine, Nurse at Hvidovre Hospital 

cards
nureet

Insights 

We identified the core aspects of what drives and hinders healthcare professionals to train on the RQI system. Identifying key areas and opportunities for the implementation of motivational rewards, and suggestions for how these achievements could be shared through social networks.

 

Outcome

The final deliverable was a shareable web platform which contained our findings, insights and recommendations for a future implementation strategy. Alongside this we include a tool-kit of customizable templates of various workshop materials available for use by Laerdal staff in further user-centred development and research.

Insights 

We identified the core aspects of what drives and hinders healthcare professionals to train on the RQI system. Identifying key areas and opportunities for the implementation of motivational rewards, and suggestions for how these achievements could be shared through social networks.

 

Outcome

The final deliverable was a shareable web platform which contained our findings, insights and recommendations for a future implementation strategy. Alongside this we include a tool-kit of customizable templates of various workshop materials available for use by Laerdal staff in further user-centred development and research.

 

Insights 

We identified the core aspects of what drives and hinders healthcare professionals to train on the RQI system. Identifying key areas and opportunities for the implementation of motivational rewards, and suggestions for how these achievements could be shared through social networks.

 

Outcome

The final deliverable was a shareable web platform which contained our findings, insights and recommendations for a future implementation strategy. Alongside this we include a tool-kit of customizable templates of various workshop materials available for use by Laerdal staff in further user-centred development and research.

Insights 

We identified the core aspects of what drives and hinders healthcare professionals to train on the RQI system. Identifying key areas and opportunities for the implementation of motivational rewards, and suggestions for how these achievements could be shared through social networks.

 


Outcome

The final deliverable was a shareable web platform which contained our findings, insights and recommendations for a future implementation strategy. Alongside this we include a tool-kit of customizable templates of various workshop materials available for use by Laerdal staff in further user-centred development and research.

IMG_0647 (2)

Presenting research and toolkits to product dev team and management.

Presenting research and toolkits to product dev team and management.

Presenting research and toolkits to product dev team and management.

Presenting research and toolkits to product dev team and management.

“Your user tests in Glostrup and Hvidovre hospitals shows us yet again, that a community of users for co-development and co-creation are located just outside our doors...a lot of great insights can be gained, as shown through your work with using games and tangible instruments to elicit feedback and opinions”

- Tim Cooke, Director self learning skills, Laerdal


“Your user tests in Glostrup and Hvidovre hospitals shows us yet again, that a community of users for co-development and co-creation are located just outside our doors...a lot of great insights can be gained, as shown through your work with using games and tangible instruments to elicit feedback and opinions”

- Tim Cooke, Director self learning skills, Laerdal


“Your user tests in Glostrup and Hvidovre hospitals shows us yet again, that a community of users for co-development and co-creation are located just outside our doors...a lot of great insights can be gained, as shown through your work with using games and tangible instruments to elicit feedback and opinions”

- Tim Cooke, Director self learning skills, Laerdal


“Your user tests in Glostrup and Hvidovre hospitals shows us yet again, that a community of users for co-development and co-creation are located just outside our doors...a lot of great insights can be gained, as shown through your work with using games and tangible instruments to elicit feedback and opinions”

- Tim Cooke, Director self learning skills, Laerdal


“Your user tests in Glostrup and Hvidovre hospitals shows us yet again, that a community of users for co-development and co-creation are located just outside our doors...a lot of great insights can be gained, as shown through your work with using games and tangible instruments to elicit feedback and opinions”

- Tim Cooke, Director self learning skills, Laerdal


Alice Moynihan  . ©  2018